Deadline to Apply Extended to April 6th!

Brooklyn CSA+D is seeking applications from New York City based artists and designers! We're looking for applicants to create 57 - 65 individual pieces or editions for the 2014 season. If you create paintings, sculptures, drawings, illustrations, photographs, prints, or any type of design object, we're looking for you! Selected applicants will receive a $3,000 commission and a full share in the 2014 season. Please apply today and help spread the word!

Interview with Jeff Scher

On an ongoing basis, we will feature one of our selected artists or designers whose work has been distributed to our shareholders. This week’s featured artist/designer is Jeff Scher.

Jeff Scher created 50 unique watercolor drawings of cameras he lost due to Sandy in 2012. Each drawing is 8x10".

We asked Jeff some questions about applying to Brooklyn CSA+D and his process for creating the work.

Why did you apply to Brooklyn CSA+D?

I like the whole concept and the way it circumvents galleries and how it's so democratic. I also love painting in a series, as an animator fifty drawings is a comportable unit of work.

Why did you want to make this particular work for Brooklyn CSA+D shareholders?

I made a series of fifty water color drawings of objects that were washed out of my studio and destroyed last year by Sandy. I'm using water color to resurrect the things via the medium that destroyed them. The images are washy and ghost like. 

Kodak Brownie

Kodak Brownie

How do you approach the art world to sell and market your work?  How do you find opportunities?

I did well with a gallery a while back, but they went under and since then I have only sold through my website and people writing me after seeing one of my films or an article on my work. 
 

Ansco Brick Camera

Ansco Brick Camera

What is the most exciting aspect of participating in Brooklyn CSA+D?

Expanding my audience and cashing a check.

What keeps you up at night?

Between teaching and parenting, I work nights. 

Interview with Hannah June Lueptow

On an ongoing basis, we will feature one of our selected artists or designers whose work has been distributed to our shareholders. This week’s featured artist/designer is Hannah June Lueptow.

Hannah June Lueptow created an edition of a ceramic teapot with a cork stopper. The teapot is 5.5" x 5.5" x 3".

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We asked Hannah some questions about applying to Brooklyn CSA+D and her process for creating the work.

Why did you apply to Brooklyn CSA+D?

I heard about CSA+D through the American Design Club. It seemed like a great opportunity to get some of my slipcasting work out to buyers. I had heard of Community Shared Agriculture and this seemed like such an awesome twist on the idea I had to apply!

Why did you want to make this particular work for Brooklyn CSA+D shareholders?

I wanted to design something that was beautiful but still functional. The Chick-a-Tea Pot was really fun to design. I started by sketching tons of teapots playing with the flat silhouette. I then moved to working three dimensionally with clay to get the right form. I made the plaster mold and started slipcasting.

It feels really nice to touch and to hold and that is something that anyone can appreciate and enjoy when they interact with it. 

How do you approach the art world to sell and market your work?  How do you find opportunities?

I started by selling work at festivals in the summer. I like to check design blogs, enter competitions, and have booths at craft fairs but overall I think the most important thing is to be open and willing to pursue new opportunities, meet new people, and never stop creating new pieces.  

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What is the most exciting aspect of participating in Brooklyn CSA+D?

It's the first one so of course it's exciting! The whole experience has been really fun for me and I was really excited to meet everyone and see the work from the other artists.

What keeps you up at night?

My IKEA mattress

Interview with Niv Tishbi

On an ongoing basis, we will feature one of our selected artists or designers whose work has been distributed to our shareholders. This week’s featured artist/designer is Niv Tishbi.

Niv Tishbi created an illustrated poster edition called 'Recent Activity'.  The poster is a silk screen print in a limited edition of 52.

Recent Activity

Recent Activity

We asked Niv some questions about applying to Brooklyn CSA+D and his process for creating the work. 

Why did you apply to Brooklyn CSA+D?

It is known that CSA+D is following the model of community-supported agriculture.  While I personally don't consume fruits and vegetables all that much, I am a great consumer of art and design.  Therefore I applaud this concept.  I applied to Brooklyn CSA+D because of the possibilities it creates for artists like myself, with the help of the community; opportunities to create something new.

Why did you want to make this particular work for Brooklyn CSA+D shareholders?

When I initially began to create my piece for Brooklyn CSA+D, I chose to deal with the concept of a community.  However, the idea of a community is still quite blurry to me.  I believe that nowadays the most significant communities we see ourselves a part of to are not necessarily bounded by geographical boundaries or our biological environment.  We all live in new virtual alternative communities.  In my piece 'Recent Activity', I seemingly describe a defined area evidently existing beyond its physical location.  The community is made up of individuals who are self-centered and blindly focused in their personal devices.  Their interaction with one another does not exist and their presence in the public space is almost meaningless.  I wanted to illustrate the absurd situation we live in. A world in which the border between reality and its representation is vague, a world that can be deleted with one tap.

How do you approach the art world to sell and market your work?  How do you find opportunities?

Following the previous question, I don't believe the internet to be all bad.  There are many benefits to the cyber world; it creates lots of opportunities and can be a very important tool for marketing.  With that being said, I still don't even have my own website!  It's on my to-do list for years, but I can never find the time for it.  So until then I make sure to take part in exhibitions, some fairs and festivals and send my work to contests in order to get my dose of exposure.

What is the most exciting aspect of participating in Brooklyn CSA+D?

I find quite exciting the fact that people invest in something upfront, when they have no idea what they will get in return.  It's obviously a gamble for the buyers.  For me, the responsibility I get motivates me to create something memorable that won't let people down.

What keeps you up at night?

Food and sex.

 

Interview with Evan Venegas

Each week we will feature one of our selected artists or designers whose work has been distributed to our shareholders. This week’s featured artist/designer is Evan Venegas.

Evan Venegas created 52 unique water color paintings  for the September 21st pick up at Recession Art gallery.  

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We asked Evan some questions about applying to Brooklyn CSA+D and his process for creating the work. 

Why did you apply to Brooklyn CSA+D?

I really love the CSA concept.  I feel good supporting my local farm CSA that I am a member of.  I enjoy putting my trust in the CSA and then getting excited to see what we get each week.  Being a member of a CSA is another way of being a part of a community of like minded people.  As an artist I thought it would be rewarding to create a body of work under the CSA conditions, which I find so satisfying in my own life.  I also enjoy the idea of being on the other side, as a contributor to the CSA, putting my work into the trust of the members.

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Why did you want to make this particular work for Brooklyn CSA+D shareholders? 

These paintings are inspired by the birth of my daughter.  I used watercolors, which are a delicate medium, a basic shape, and subtle use of color to show fragility.

 I wanted to show a complete body, while at the time, showing the individual parts that create it.  My process was initiated by my own daily organizing and setting values to life tasks, events, situations and other "emotional data."  I then translate these values into different colors and sizes of circles.  The arrangement of these individual shapes, which build a unified piece, represent the process of balancing elements in my life.  I wanted to make something that was unique for each shareholder.  I wanted each piece to have a unique and personal experience.  Once I start working on one of these pieces,  they sort of take on a life if their own.  After the first shape placement, the next shape is a reaction and then I begin to work out the balance of color shape and size.

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How do you approach the art world to sell and market your work?  How do you find opportunities? 

My approach to the art world is to surround myself with people that I like.  I stay true to myself and the vision of my work.  With this strategy I have inadvertently managed to generate interest in what I do; from people that I enjoy being around.  I always keep an open mind about what opportunities are out there.  I don’t really think any opportunity is below or above me.  I try to have fun with what I do.  I try to not take myself too seriously, which sometimes is lot easier said than done.

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What is the most exciting aspect of participating in Brooklyn CSA+D?

It was a challenge to make 52 pieces; I usually don’t work on that large of an edition.  I am excited to see what the other artists create and how they approach this process.  There is a satisfying freedom in creating work for someone that trusts that they want your work by being a member of this CSA.

What keeps you up at night?

There is too much information floating around these days; and it is so enticing.

 

 

 

Interview with CHIAOZZA

Each week we will feature one of our selected artists or designers whose work has been distributed to our shareholders. This week’s featured artist/designer is CHIAOZZA.

A-Frames, studio shot, matte acrylic gouache and wood stains on wood

A-Frames, studio shot, matte acrylic gouache and wood stains on wood

CHIAOZZA  created 52 unique A-Frames for the September 21st pick up at Recession Art gallery.  Each full share (and some half shares) included a unique A-Frame.  .

The A-Frame evokes a simple yet curious handmade object that can hang on the wall and create a sense of wonder and excitement in each shareholder’s home.

A-Frame, Untitled (No. 38), matte acrylic gouache on wood

A-Frame, Untitled (No. 38), matte acrylic gouache on wood

We asked CHIAOZZA some questions about applying to Brooklyn CSA+D and their process for creating the work. 

Why did you apply to Brooklyn CSA+D?

We are a big fan of CSA’s that support local farmers and when we heard that there was a program in Brooklyn supporting local artists and designers we were immediately intrigued. We were excited to apply to CSA+D because we value when support for anyone’s practice or business comes from people close to home. Brooklyn is our home right now and we love engaging with this community.

Why did you want to make this particular work for Brooklyn CSA+D shareholders? 

As CHIAOZZA we have a project titled The A-Frames, which are an exploration into geometry, color and display in the form of sculptural wall objects. They are inspired by a Danish folk design from the island of Amager, near Copenhagen, hand-cut with traditional woodworking saws and assembled using simple wooden lap joints and no glue. The A-Frames are hung on a nail and can be used for displaying arrangements of small objects on a wall, or displayed as aesthetic objects. Shapes include variations on triangles, parallelograms, and letter forms.

We were interested in the aesthetics of function and simple wood construction, and also for housing our various collections of small rocks, sculptures, found objects and keepsakes. The A-Frames have evolved to take on a curious visual language of their own, recalling primitive language forms, landscape iconography, and contemporary geometric shapes.

For CSA+D shareholders we created 52 unique designs on a slightly smaller scale and focused more on the objects as wall sculptures and less as shelves. 

How do you approach the art world to sell and market your work?  How do you find opportunities?  

We have created an on-line marketplace for CHIAOZZA on our personal website, http://chiaozza.bigcartel.com/. We also have a small shop on Etsy and have had a couple of flash sales through Fab.com with some success. Ideally we would like to see larger installations of these pieces with multiples creating one piece, either in a fine art context in a gallery, or installation work at festivals, or as custom projects in people’s homes. The trick is finding the opportunities that suit us best. We have been allowing our growth to move at a somewhat slow pace so we can continue to get what we want to out of the process. For instance, we were once approached to have our work mass produced in China, and as flattering as it is to imagine these objects made on a large scale, it doesn’t necessarily fit together with our desire to work with our hands and stay creative in the process. We are excited to see CHIAOZZA grow, and we want to do it in a way that feels positive

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What is the most exciting aspect of participating in Brooklyn CSA+D?

Our biggest interest in participating in Brooklyn CSA+D is to engage and create relationships with people in the New York area that are interested in what artist’s in the area are making. We seek a more direct connection between designer, maker, and user and Brooklyn CSA+D is setting up a model that links artists with the community around them.

What keeps you up at night? 

Hopefully nothing because we are so beat from such an active day. But…sometimes the air conditioner, it is a beast. Occasionally singing songs with our friends can keep us up pretty late.

 

Interview with Julia Gualtieri

Each week we will feature one of our selected artists or designers whose work has been distributed to our shareholders. This week’s featured artist/designer is Julia Gualtieri.

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Julia Gualtieri created hand silk screened wallpaper for the September 21st pick up at Recession Art gallery.  Each full share (and some half shares) included a roll of 28” x 90”wallpaper on acid free Legion Lenox 100% cotton paper.

The roll of wallpaper can be permanently glued to a wall (appropriate for homeowners) or non-permanently installed (appropriate for renters).  It can also be cut down to make smaller prints and framed, or given as gifts to friends and family.  As an experienced printmaker who has recently delved into the world of designing and printing repeating patterns, Julia was very excited about the world of possibilities inherent in this form.  No two households will treat the wallpaper the same. 

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We asked Julia some questions about applying to Brooklyn CSA+D and her process for creating the work.  

Why did you apply to Brooklyn CSA+D?

I am always looking for places and opportunities where I think I can do something cool or be useful in some way.  This looking has brought me to artists residencies, school classrooms, museums, non-profit organizations, a skateboard camp, on a cycling trip teaching comics classes, and so on.  No matter the situation there’s always the initial inspiration--“Oh! I have an idea for that!” or “That place seems interesting, I’d like to do something!”--which is often unplanned and sort of out of the blue but feels right.  When the CSA+D opportunity appeared in my orbit, an idea that had been simmering for a few years suddenly felt like the perfect project to propose.  As a supporter of a farm CSA, the connections were immediately apparent and it made a lot of sense to me.  I think it's an exciting model to apply to the art world.

Why did you want to make this particular work for Brooklyn CSA+D shareholders?

The reason I felt my piece was a good fit for CSA+D is because it can literally be cut up, transformed, and installed to suit the needs of any home.  It’s a flexible piece and up to the owner to figure out how to approach it.  My aesthetic is playful, it is influenced by the work I do with children, by comic books, and skateboard graphics.  If something I make passes the scrutiny of a seven year old, I’m happy.

How do you approach the art world to sell and market your work?  How do you find opportunities?  

How I “make it” as an artist is a confluence of things and has been greatly shaped by the community I live in (Providence, RI).  I look for grants and residencies, I get tapped to design books and posters.  I work part time teaching and part time at a small commercial printshop.  At any given time I might be needing my craftsperson brain, educator brain, administrator brain, collaborator brain, artist brain, or all of the above.

I continue to grapple with how I want my work to exist in a market economy and how to define success.  Does the world need more successful people or more kind people? I’m not suggesting the two are mutually exclusive, but it’s something I think about a lot.

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What is the most exciting aspect of participating in Brooklyn CSA+D?

Everything about this project, from the online presence to the coordination of the pick-up event, feels like it has the potential to become a connected community of art makers and art lovers.  I look forward to meeting new folks and getting updates on what fellow CSA+D artists are up to in the future.  I especially hope that once the pieces go out to their new homes, the shareholders will document and share how they live with their artworks, that will be an interesting part of the story.

What keeps you up at night?

Game of Thrones.

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